3. Results

3. Results

3.1 Carbon monoxide test results
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Above is a table of carbon monoxide ppm readings from the MQ7 sensor when different numbers of paper are burnt. As can be seen from the chart above, the values of carbon monoxide increase as the number of pieces of paper burnt increase. This shows that the carbon monoxide sensor is accurate as when more pieces of paper are burnt, more smoke will be produced and more carbon monoxide will be present. This chart also gives us a general idea of what the ppm of carbon monoxide will be when the different numbers of paper are burnt, so that we can decide on how many pieces of paper we want to burn for the experimentation of the device.

After analysing the chart above, we have decided to burn three pieces of paper for the experimentation because we think that burning one or two pieces of paper may not produce enough carbon monoxide for the system to test.

3.2 Experiment 1 results
Figure 3.2.1 - chart showing carbon monoxide readings determined by the MQ7 carbon monoxide sensor over 30 minutes at 5 minute intervals
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Figure 3.2.2 - Line graph representing the carbon monoxide levels (ppm) against time (min)
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3.3 Experiment 2 results
Figure 3.3.1 - chart showing carbon monoxide readings determined by the MQ7 carbon monoxide sensor over 30 minutes at 5 minute intervals

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Figure 3.3.2 - Line graph representing the carbon monoxide levels (ppm) against time (min)
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3.4 Experiment 3 results
Figure 3.4.1 - chart showing carbon monoxide readings determined by the MQ7 carbon monoxide sensor over 30 minutes at 5 minute intervals
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Figure 3.4.2 - Line graph representing the carbon monoxide levels (ppm) against time (min)
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3.5 Average of all experiments
3.5.1 Chart showing average carbon monoxide readings determined by the MQ7 carbon monoxide sensor over 30 minutes at 5 minute intervals
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3.5.2 Line graph representing average carbon monoxide levels (ppm) against time (min)
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3.6 Conclusions
After completing all the experiments, overall, the air purifier and the carbon monoxide sensor are both successful. The carbon monoxide sensor was able to detect the change of carbon monoxide levels in the surrounding air. The air purifier was able to decrease the level of carbon monoxide as seen in the above charts and graphs. For every single line graph, it can be clearly observed that the carbon monoxide levels faced a decline over time.

In order to get a more accurate overview of the efficiency of our device, we calculated the average ppm value of carbon monoxide in each experiment for each time interval and plotted the results found in the graph and chart for section 3.5. In that graph, besides one small jump in the carbon monoxide level between the ten and fifteen minute interval, the ppm value of carbon monoxide level is decreasing.

Hence, we can link it back to the fact that our air purifier is successful in clearing the haze. However, we were still unable to reach our goal of making the ppm of carbon monoxide lesser than 20 ppm in 30 minutes.

3.7 Special observations
There were some special observations whereby the levels of carbon monoxide increased suddenly then went back down. This was observed in experiment 2. A possible explanation for this observation would be that the carbon monoxide were not circulating around the experimental area properly due to the displacement in the air caused by the rotary fans, and the sensor could not sense the reading of carbon monoxide in the whole area, but only the area around the sensor itself. Hence, the reading at that point in time was not accurate and the levels of carbon monoxide increased.

We also observed that the ppm of carbon monoxide in the last experiment was a lot lower than that of the earlier experiments. That was probably because we burnt less of the three pieces of paper, and therefore lesser smoke was produced. Since lesser smoke was produced, there was lesser carbon monoxide circulating in the box and the readings from the MQ7 carbon monoxide sensor was lower.

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